Case Study
Living with a VortexAir Hybrid
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Living with a VortexAir Hybrid
The VortexAir Hybrid has significantly reduced this household's oil useage

Two years ago, a Grant VortexAir Hybrid was installed as part of a new heating system for a 200 year old listed cottage. In this case study, we return to this Wiltshire home to hear from the homeowner to discover how hybrid heating has fulfilled their expectations.

A 200 year old cottage, which is located on the outskirts of the historic Wiltshire town of Corsham, was completely renovated in 2018. Part of the renovation involved upgrading the property’s heating system from old internal oil-fired boiler to a Grant VortexAir air source heat pump/oil boiler hybrid. The project was completed in time for the homeowners to move into the property in January 2019 and, over two years on, we caught up with them and their installer to discover what difference a hybrid heating system has made to their day to day living.

The project
“We inherited the cottage in 2018 and started its renovation in the same year,” comments the homeowner. “Researching the best heating solution for this listed building took time because we wanted to heat our home in a more environmentally friendly way while also factoring in some of the hurdles a 200 year old building can present. For example, we have original stone floors that we wanted to keep so installing underfloor heating was not really option and neither was a stand-alone heat pump. The VortexAir provided us with the solution we needed, combining a renewable heat source with the back up of a highly efficient oil boiler.”

The products
The larger of the two Grant VortexAir Hybrid models was installed, combining a Grant Aerona³ air source heat pump with a 21/26kW VortexBlue blue flame oil boiler. For this particular hybrid installation, both the heat pump and the boiler were sited externally as one complete unit. A 300ltr Grant MonoWave High Performance cylinder was also installed which effectively works with the hybrid to provide the hot water.

The review
“The hybrid system has now been in for two years and we are very happy with it overall,” continues the homeowner. “We hardly have to do anything with the VortexAir – it operates like a normal boiler to us. We manage our heating via our heating programmer and it is the heat pump which is working the majority of the time. The oil boiler only kicks in to give the system a boost when it gets really cold outside.

“We topped up our oil tank about a year ago, at the beginning of 2020. Since then, the oil gauge has literally moved only one point on our monitor so we have used around £50 worth of oil in the last twelve months which is unbelievable. We are also happy with our electricity usage – the heat pump obviously uses electricity but we have not noticed much of an increase on our bills.”

The VortexAir has not only pleased the homeowner but also their installer, G1 Installers, Howard Croker Partnerships Ltd. “The VortexAir is a good bit kit and very well manufactured,” comments David Croker. “This installation was our first time fitting a Grant hybrid and it was quite straightforward to us as we are familiar with Grant products. Aside from a couple of electrical differences and the installation of a volumiser, it was not too far adrift from what we are used to with a boiler install. In a nutshell, we would have no hesitation in fitting another Grant hybrid.”

The combination of very low oil fuel usage with the green credentials of the heat pump have proven the VortexAir Hybrid to be a success for this home. The homeowners of this four-bedroom cottage have not only benefitted from lower fuel bills but also from a lower carbon footprint. By choosing a Grant hybrid, this listed property has been able to incorporate renewable energy into its heating system while also having the support of an oil boiler for when demand exceeds the output of the heat pump on its own – the best of both worlds can really be enjoyed.

Living with a VortexAir Hybrid
The renovated 200 year old cottage which is being kept warm by a hybrid heating system

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